Computer Science

Department of Computer Science

People

CWSEI Deptartment Director: Rachel Pottinger, Ian Mitchell, Paul Carter

STLFs:
    Alice Campbell – involved in CPSC 100, 103, 110, 210
    Jessica Dawson – involved in CPSC 100, 103, 110, 210, 320, 344, 444, 430
    Hassan Khosravi – APSC 160, CPSC 259, 304
    Allison Elliott Tew – involved in CPSC 110, 210, 211, 260, 310, and 317
    Ryan Golbeck - involved in CPSC 110 and 210
    Ben Yu - involved in CPSC , 111, 121, 211, 213, 221, 304, 310, 322, 404, and APSC 160
    Raymond Lister - involved in CPSC 111, CPSC 260, and APSC 160
    Beth Simon - involved in the early work of CPSC 101, 111, 121, 211, 213, and 221
  Part-time Faculty STLFs (roughly 20% appointments for two years):
    Don Acton – involved in CPSC 213, 313, 317
    Ed Knorr – involved in CPSC 259, 304, 404
    Steve Wolfman– involved in developing a concept inventory for the “foundations of computing” stream (CPSC 121, 221, 320)

Faculty: D. Acton, M. Allen, P. Belleville, G. Carenini, P. Carter, C. Conati, A. Condon, M. Dulat, K. Eiselt, M. Feeley, M. Friedlander, W. Heidrich, H. Hoos, N. Hutchinson, G. Kiczales, E. Knorr, K. Leyton-Brown, J. Luk, K. Maclean, J. McGrenere, I. Mitchell, G. Murphy, R. Ng, R. Pottinger, D. Poole, G. Tsiknis, K. Voll, S. Wolfman

Post-docs: Frank Hutter, Gabriel Murray

Activity

Activity summary report for the Computer Science CWSEI group (course and curriculum projects, research, development of assessment tools) - PDF download

Poster from CWSEI End-of-Year 2012: Computer Science SEI: An Overview - PDF download

Learning goals for lower-division courses (2008) includes CPSC 111, 121, 211, 213, 221 - zip file download

Overview

Computer Science received seed funding from CWSEI in 2007 and began the efforts listed below in the Fall. The department moved to full funding starting in mid-2008.

Computer Science plans to use CWSEI's scientific approach to improve student learning throughout our curriculum as an iterative process including:

  • articulating clear learning goals for our individual courses and our program as a whole,
  • developing both formative assessments to guide teaching and learning techniques and summative assessments (i.e., exams) that evaluate those learning goals,
  • revising our teaching techniques in response to assessments,
  • and establishing administrative structures to sustain these efforts.